Southwest Commission on Religious Studies

2020 Call for Papers

GENERAL INFORMATION

The annual meeting will be held February 28-March 1, 2020 at the Dallas Marriott Las Colinas (223 West Las Colinas Boulevard, Irving, TX 75039). This year each of the member societies in SWCRS has been invited to think creatively about incorporating the theme of “Religion in Crisis” into sessions of the 2020 meeting; members are encouraged to submit paper proposals around this theme. In addition, we invite proposals that are discipline-specific and make a contribute to the ongoing discussion of critical issues in the fields of archaeology, biblical studies and religious studies.

Proposals should be submitted per the instructions of each organization (some ask that you use a common submission form, others ask for email submissions). Please indicate if the proposal is being submitted to more than one section. Proposals may be submitted to more than one section, but in order to accommodate as many people as possible, papers may not be read more than once during the meeting. Unless otherwise indicated, the deadline for paper proposal submission is Oct. 15, 2019.

A response to your proposal will be sent within one month of the deadline. If your proposal is accepted, you should confirm in writing your participation in the session with the program chair. In addition, you must register for the meeting through the Eventbrite site for SWCRS 2019. All presenters and presiders must register at least one month prior to the meeting.

Powerpoint and Other Projection Media Presentations Policy

Due to the prohibitive costs of hotel audio-visual rentals, SWCRS does not provide computers, projectors, or video monitors for presentations.  Those persons submitting proposals for presentation must be prepared to provide their own equipment, or to plan for printed copies of any visual elements of their presentation.  Questions regarding this policy should be addressed to the relevant organization (AAR, SBL, e.g.) and/or the section coordinator (Ethics, Hebrew Bible, e.g.).

 

AMERICAN SCHOOLS OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH

ASOR invites paper proposals on ongoing excavations, archaeological theory and/or method, and other topics relating to material culture and archaeology in the Mediterranean and Ancient Near East. Papers are especially welcome from those with interdisciplinary approaches that enhance more traditional archaeological methods and those whose primary discipline is not archaeology.

Current students who are members in good standing of ASOR are eligible to participate in the annual Student Paper Award. Applicants for the Student Paper Award must submit a completed copy of their presentation and paper for consideration by Friday, February 21, 2020.

All proposals should be submitted in MS-Word and should include the name and university affiliation of the presenter, the title, and an abstract of 200-300 words.

Send proposals by Oct. 15, 2019 to:

David Vila, John Brown University, dvila@jbu.edu

 

ASSOCIATION FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION

The Association for the Scientific Study of Religion invites paper proposals on any topic concerning the scientific study of religion, particularly those dealing with the sociological, philosophical, economic, historical, psychological, and political considerations of religion in society. The ASSR welcomes proposals from members of other SWCRS affiliates. Proposals may be submitted to more than one SWCRS affiliate; but, in order to accommodate as many participants as possible, papers may not be read more than once during the SWCRS meeting.

Upon acceptance of a proposal, ASSR admin will send a membership invoice; members with PayPal accounts can directly submit dues through the PayPal link on the ASSR website (http://www.assronline.org/membership). Anyone presenting a paper must be a member of ASSR and must ensure payment of dues as outlined above. Participants must also register for the annual meeting through the SWCRS website and pay the applicable cost of registration and book with the conference hotel.

IMPORTANT: ASSR dues are separate from and not included in any payments made in connection with the SWCRS.

PAPER PROPOSALS   Send proposals to: Dr. Ben D. Craver, Wayland Baptist University, San Antonio, Texas, at craverb@wbu.edu. The deadline for submitting proposals is end of the day, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019.

PAPER SUBMISSIONS   Please submit the completed paper to Dr. Jon Loessin, Wharton County Junior College, Wharton, Texas, at j-dloessin@sbcglobal.net or jonl@wcjc.edu. Your paper must be received by end of the day, Sunday, January 26, 2020, in order to be considered for inclusion in the annual Proceedings of the Association for the Scientific Study of Religion, and/or to be considered for the Frank P. Forwood Award. Graduate and Undergraduate students are encouraged to submit paper proposals. Accepted proposals will be eligible to compete for the Harry Hale Prize for graduate and undergraduate research with an honorarium for selected papers. All papers must adhere to the ASSR Style Guide for Papers located on the ASSR website.

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF RELIGION SOUTHWEST REGION

This year’s theme is Religion and Crisis. From war and violence to peacemaking, from sexual abuse to the #MeToo movement, from xenophobia to human rights and dialogue, from climate change denials to environmental justice movements, religion can play multiple roles in crises. For the 2020 conference—not coincidentally an election year—we want to ponder religion’s relationship to crisis past and present. How does religion create or perpetuate crises? How does religion offer resilience and hope in response to crises?

You may submit any proposal that addresses this theme tailored to an individual section below. Sections will also consider proposals on topics beyond the conference theme.

All proposals should be submitted through this link: Propose a Paper or Propose a Panel.

For questions related to a specific section, contact the convener listed below. For other questions, you may contact Tiffany Puett, tiffany@diversityandciviclife.org or Jennifer Hancock, jenhancock73@gmail.com.

 

Arts, Literature, and Religion

Unit Chair: Rebecca Poe Hays, R_Hays@Baylor.edu

The Arts, Literature, and Religion section investigates the artistic representations of religion as a force in everyday life, notes the expectations within these representations, and explores the influence that these representations impress upon the surrounding world. This interdisciplinary program unit invites papers exploring any aspect of the intersection between art, literature, and religion. We additionally provide a forum for the exploration of religion and religious themes through one’s own art, and thus invite proposals for artistic presentations, performances, and galleries (e.g., painting, photography, music, creative writing, etc.). In addition to a general call for high quality presentations and papers engaging the intersection of Art, Literature, and Religion, we especially invite papers and presentations that engage this year’s conference theme, “Religion and Crisis.”

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Black Theology

Unit Chair: Gary Green, g.f.green@tcu.edu

With the many public issues that have come up amid the approaching election cycle, religion remains a central part of the public conversation. It has been used to justify mistreatment of persons in this country and abroad. It also continues to provide resources for resistance for faith communities seeking justice. The Black Theology section invites proposals that relate to the overall conference theme, Religion and Crisis, with particular consideration of this theme in the context of Black communities. Preference will be given to proposals that consider issues of race in relation to religion and crisis, as well as those that engage the intersections of sexuality, gender, and class. We are especially interested in proposals that take up the question of religion’s role in these issues, whether for good or for ill. While proposals that engage the conference theme will be given priority, all submissions will be seriously considered based on their potential to enrich broader conversations related to Black Theology.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Comparative and Asian Studies in Religion

Unit Chair: Mark Dennis, m.dennis@tcu.edu

The Comparative and Asian Studies in Religion section invites paper and panel proposals on historical and contemporary aspects of Asian religious thought and practice. We are especially interested in individual papers and panels addressing this year’s conference theme “Religion and Crisis.”

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Ethics, Society, and Cultural Analysis

Unit Chairs: Katina Harris, kharris56@student.pvamu.edu

The Ethics, Society, and Cultural Analysis Section invites paper and panel proposals on themes and topics related to ethics, society, and culture. We especially encourage proposals addressing this year’s conference theme: “Religion and Crisis.”  Religion can play multiple roles in crises and this year we encourage abstracts exploring religion’s role in past and present crises. Topics for consideration include, but are not limited to, social justice and human rights issues (e.g., war, violence, peacemaking, sexual abuse, and environmental justice). Topics may also explore religion’s role in creating crises, perpetuating crises, offering hope, or fostering resilience in crises.

Proposals involving multiple presentations or panel discussions (comprised of no more than three participants) focused upon a single topic, figure, or text are welcome. Proposals that feature interdisciplinary or inter-institutional participation, and that promise to stimulate productive discussion, are particularly attractive.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

History of Christianity

Unit Chairs: Rachel Ozanne, rachel.ozanne@gmail.com and Ryan Fitzgerald, ryan.fitz@utexas.edu

In times of crisis, Christians have historically turned to their religious faith and practices to understand how to respond. In particular, they have considered their relationship to governing powers and power structures, though in drastically different ways—from Paul’s exhortation to obey the law of the land all the way to David Koresh’s retreat to a private compound. This session invites papers that critically examine how Christians from any and all parts of the world have understood and acted upon their understanding of their relationship to the worldly powers that be. Papers can consider these and related questions: How have Christians condemned and/or condoned corporate power structures? How has secularism affected Christian political movements? How has Christianity been used in service to military regimes? Submissions might also consider the ways in which those in power have utilized Christian ideas and practices to respond to times of crisis. Ultimately, we hope to consider the vast array of ways in which people who consider themselves Christian have interacted with the world around them to understand, to interpret, to respond to or to retreat from crisis.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Latinx Religions

Unit Chair: João Chaves, drjoaochaves18@gmail.com

The Latinx Religion section invites papers and panel proposals that deal with all subjects and themes that fall under the broadly-defined Latinx Religion scope. However, we encourage proposals that focus on this year’s Conference Theme, “Religion and Crisis,” particularly: (1) Religion and the New Right in Latin America, (2) Latinx Religions and resistance in Trump’s America, and (3) Religion and gender struggles in Latinx and Latin American contexts.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Philosophy of Religion

Unit Chair: Kandace Geldmeier, Kandace.Geldmeier@gmail.com

Proposals are invited in all areas of philosophy of religion, including metaphysics, phenomenology, epistemology, ethics and theodicy. Papers are particularly encouraged along the 2020 theme, “Religion and Crisis.”

Thinkers and theories across the many facets of philosophy of religion are keenly aware of the crises of the day and of the responsibility to address them. As the conference theme outlines, we want to ponder religion’s relationship to crisis past and present. How does religion create or perpetuate crises? How does religion offer resilience and hope in response to crises? In what ways does philosophy of religion, broadly speaking, critically engage with the topic of crisis? This could also be construed as crises within the field of philosophy of religion, religious crisis, and/or with philosophical engagement with current events.

Proposals involving multiple presentations or panel discussions (no more than three participants) focused upon a single topic, figure, or text are welcome. Each panelist should provide an abstract for such submissions. Proposals that feature interdisciplinary or inter-institutional participation, and that promise to stimulate productive discussion, are particularly attractive.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Religion & Class

Unit Chair: Susanne Scholz, sscholz@mail.smu.edu

We invite papers on any aspect of religion and class, particularly in regard to past and present moments of crisis, such as war, violence, or peacemaking, sexual abuse or the #MeToo movement, xenophobia, racism, sexism, homophobia or transphobia, human rights issues, manufactured crises, the use of propaganda, global climate change, or any other past or present forces, movements, or ideas preventing or fostering social justice in the world.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Religion, Gender & Sexuality

Unit Chairs: Chad Pevateaux, cjpevateaux@txwes.edu and  Laulie Eckberger, L.Eckeberger.16@unimail.winchester.ac.uk

The Religion, Gender, and Sexuality Section invites paper and panel proposals on issues related to the intersections of religion with gender and/or sexuality, both historical and contemporary. Contributors to this section are encouraged to consider the conference theme of “Religion and Crisis” through paradigms of gender identity, sex, and sexuality. Participants are invited to consider religion, gender, sexuality and crisis, broadly construed, especially in relation to the following:

  • LGBTQ* Rights and Identities in Crisis
  • Gender Crisis at the Ballot Box (e.g. Buttigieg vs. Pence, gay marriage, abortion)
  • Intersections of Gender/Sexuality Crisis and Environmental Crisis
  • Protecting the Porous Borders of the Body (Politic): Gender, Immigration, and White Male Nationalism
  • Undoing White Male Supremacy. For possible co-panel with Black Theology section
  • #MeToo and Toxic Masculinity
  • Sexual Abuse and Religion (e.g. #ChurchToo, Catholic sexual abuse crisis, abuse in guru traditions)
  • Specific Traditions, Gender, Sexuality, and Crisis (e.g. Buddhists, Gender, Sexuality and Crisis). For possible co-panel with the Comparative and Asian Studies in Religion section

Proposals involving multiple presentations or panel discussions (no more than four participants) focused upon a single topic, figure, or text are also welcome. Such proposals that feature interdisciplinary or inter-institutional participation, and that promise to stimulate productive discussion, will be favored.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

The Study of Islam

Unit Chair: Sajida Jalalzai, sjalalza@trinity.edu

This section encourages individual and panel proposals related to the study of Islam. We welcome submissions dealing with the Qur’an and the Sunna, law, philosophy, theology, mysticism, ritual, gender and sexuality, modernity and globalization, teaching, religious pluralism, and other areas of general interest.

 The theme for this year’s regional meeting is Religion and Crisis. From war and violence to peacemaking, from sexual abuse to the #MeToo movement, from xenophobia to human rights and dialogue, from climate change denials to environmental justice movements, religion can play multiple roles in crises. For the 2020 conference—not coincidentally an election year—we want to ponder religion’s relationship to crisis past and present. How does religion create or perpetuate crises? How does religion offer resilience and hope in response to crises? Some relevant topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Crises of Islamic Authority (Historical or Contemporary)
  • The Qur’an in/and Conflict
  • Islam and State Persecution
  • Muslim Crises of Faith
  • Tradition in Conflict with Modernity
  • Islam and Environmental Crisis
  • Muslims and the #MeToo Movement
  • Islamophobia, Racism, and Xenophobia
  • Islam and Incarceration
  • Islam and Muslims in Trump’s America
  • The Crisis of Islamic Masculinities
  • Muslims and the Refugee Crisis

Proposals involving multiple presentations or panel discussions (of no more than three participants) focused on a single topic are welcome. Each panelist should provide their own abstract for submission.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Theology

Unit Chairs: Natalie Carnes, Natalie_Carnes@Baylor.edu and Elise Edwards, Elise_Edwards@baylor.edu

This year, the Theology Section invites proposals that address the theme of Crisis and Christology. Proposals might treat either Christology in times of crisis or crises in Christology. Proposals that are theological and constructive, rather than simply historical, are welcomed—even if they do not bear directly on this year’s theme.

Proposals involving multiple presentations or panel discussions (no more than three participants) focused upon a single topic, figure, or publication are especially encouraged. Each panelist should provide an abstract for such submissions. Proposals that feature interdisciplinary or inter-institutional participation, and that promise to stimulate productive discussion will be favored.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

Theta Alpha Kappa and Undergraduate Research

Unit Chair: Jennifer Veninga, jennv@stedwards.edu

We are excited to announce that this year’s meeting will include two sessions dedicated to outstanding undergraduate research. For both sessions, we especially encourage papers related to this year’s conference theme, “Religion and Crisis,” though we invite submissions on all areas of religious and theological studies. One session will include papers from student members of Theta Alpha Kappa Honor Society chapters in the Southwest Region. It should be noted that, although any TAK member is permitted to submit a paper proposal for the TAK panel, this session has traditionally been a forum for undergraduates. For a second session, we invite submissions from any undergraduate student.

For both sessions, submissions must come from a sponsoring faculty member or the chapter adviser (if submitted to the TAK session) and include: 1) the presenter’s name and contact information; 2) the entire paper (preferred) or an abstract of the paper (acceptable); 3) the name of the school; and 4) venue for which the paper was prepared (i.e., honors project, senior thesis, etc.). In the event that there are more proposals than can fit in one session, faculty sponsors or local chapter advisors may be asked to select the one best submission from their schools.

Proposal a Paper or Proposal a Panel today.

 

SOCIETY OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE

The Society invites member scholars representing diverse intellectual traditions and social settings to submit paper proposals employing various methods of research and interpretation to the program units (see below under Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, and Second Temple Judaism). Proposals related to the theme “Religion and Crisis” are especially welcome.

Proposals from graduate students are welcome but must include, in addition to the participation form, a draft of the paper and the name and contact information of a faculty member who knows your work.

Proposals should be submitted no later than 15 October 2019 via the Participation Form.

Technology Policy

While we welcome the appropriate use of technology in presentations, presenters should plan to supply all audiovisual equipment and screens themselves, as the Region does not have resources available to support this.

Hebrew Bible/Old Testament

Members of the society are invited to submit proposals on a variety of topics related to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the Apocrypha and the Pseudepigrapha. Proposals may focus on specific exegetical problems, biblical theology, biblical hermeneutics, methodological studies, the Dead Sea Scrolls, race, ethnicity, gender, and pedagogy. (This list is intended to be suggestive rather than exhaustive.)

Please address any questions to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Program Chair: Dr. Ryan Stokes (email: ryanestokes@gmail.com).

[Click here to propose today.]

New Testament

Members of the society are invited to submit proposals for papers on any topic related to the study of the New Testament or other Jewish or Christian literature from Greco-Roman antiquity. Paper proposals may also treat such subjects as pedagogy or reception history. Particularly welcome are proposals that include critical reflection on traditional canonical categories and/or that approach the material with new critical approaches (e.g., feminist, liberationist, post-colonial).

Please address any questions to the New Testament Program Chair: Dr. Jill Hicks-Keeton, University of Oklahoma (email: jhk@ou.edu).

 

[Click here to propose today.]

Second Temple Judaism

Members of the society are invited to submit proposals for papers on any topic related to the study of Second Temple Jewish ideas, texts, religious, social or political practices, or relevant issues about Judaism in the Greco-Roman world.

Please address any questions to the Second Temple Judaism Program Chair:

Dr. Joseph McDonald, Brite Divinity School, TCU (email: j.mcdonald@tcu.edu).

[Click here to propose today.]

SBL Regional Scholar Award Application

Each year the national SBL Conference of Regional Coordinators recognizes excellent papers presented at regional meetings by junior members of the Society.  Consideration for the Regional Scholars Award is open to applicants who are at least at the dissertation stage of a doctoral program and who are no more than four years past the receipt of the Ph.D.

Each region can nominate one scholar annually. The national SBL Conference of Regional Coordinators selects the regional scholars from these candidates. Nomination by the region is no guarantee of selection by the national organization. Awardees will be encouraged to revise the paper presented at the regional meeting with the help of a mentor, and submit the revised paper to an appropriate program unit of the SBL national meeting. They will be recognized as Regional Scholars at the national meeting.

Applicants for the Regional Scholar Award should submit a letter of application (indicating any experience the applicant has presenting papers at the national meeting), a curriculum vitae, and a draft of a paper accepted for presentation at the regional meeting (8-10 pages of text, with appropriate documentation) to the appropriate regional SBL program unit chair (see above) by 15 January 2020. Please indicate as requested at the bottom of the Participation Form if you intend to apply for the Regional Scholar Award.